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remedies that provide certain remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested these legal protection should apply equally to drones and that they may be sufficient to alleviate any constitutional problems for any privacy concerns. in your view is this approach correct? what are the main differences between manned and unmanned aircraft as it relates to the protection of americans for their privacy concerns? >> we don't believe there are any federal statutes that would provide limits on drone surveillance in the united states. the privacy laws are very targeted to the approach the united states has taken to privacy and denting compass the surveillance drones can conduct and because of this we're actually advocating additional legislation on drone surveillance. the primary difference between and and unmanned vehicles, this has been brought up, drones are going to be able to conduct more surveillance. they are cheaper to fly, cheaper to maintain and able to conduct an incredible amount more surveillance and individuals to the surveillance and designed, built to design to carry
and congress back in 1968 actually made them the law of the land, but they don't apply to 40% of the gun sales today. something like 58,000 gun dealers across this country, three times the number of mcdonald's stores, as a matter of fact, there are gun stores every place in this country, and those gun sellers -- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one t
weapons? >> i think it may help. but law enforcement's position from day one has been to protect the families. and they have suffered enough. and to release some pictures like that may make them suffer more. and we have to talk about the families collectively. we just can't think of one, maybe, and say it's okay and we have 19 or 20 or 25 others that don't feel it's okay. i don't think that's going to work either. so i don't think we're ever going to get the full range of acceptance to releasing pictures. but i think everybody can understand, as you aptly put, the slaughter that an ar-15 can do a 6-year-old or a 7-year-old. we don't need pictures to know that. i think in our own minds, we can certainly imagine it. and that should be our driving force. >> chief fuchs, you had, i think, two children who attended sandy hook school. they no longer attend the school. they attend another newtown school, just from age point of view. for you it must have been a very, very harrowing experience again, simply because this could have been your children. >> it was. and to be honest, when i wa
into law. we will be taking that up with the "a-team." angela mcglowan, james toronto and doug schoen. our first guest is here to evaluate obama's middle east tour. today's focus on the enormous price on jordan as a result of the syrian civil war. joining me now is judith miller and quivered clifford may. it is a very big positive impression with this to her, if not a concrete result. >> it was an extraordinary tour. the israelis called it a thermo nuclear charm offensive. talk about a restart in a relationship that was crying out. basically the president figured out do you attract more bees with honey in a country like israel who did everything he had to do to put a relationship on course. lou: wasn't he inconsistent to be talking about peace in the middle east? at the same time that he was threatening bashar al-assad and a wrong? >> yes, but they are both provocative. they are both belligerent. they are destabilizing forces and have been for years. he understands that the israelis are reliable allies, valuable allies in many ways. they are in a difficult neighborhood. the israelis, two y
neil/lehrer productions >> ifill: supreme court justices weighed a challenge to an arizona law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk to marcia coyle about today's court arguments, and ask about the broader implications for other immigration laws. >> ifill: then we turn to the banking crisis in cyprus, as european union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight
. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of yucca mountain which by law is designated as the site for permanent geological repository for our nation's spent nuclear fuel. last year the president's blue ribbon commission on america's nuclear future issued a report but barred from even evaluating the merits of yucca mountain, despite the fact that it has been approved in a bipartisan basis by congress and signed into law by the president -- actually reaffirmed by signing of the law in 2002, the initial law was passed in 1982, and the law was amended in 1987 which in a bipartisan manner passed thue both chambers, signed by -- through both chambers, signed by different presidents, established that yucca mountain would be the repository for our nuclear spent fuel. what the blue ribbon commission did say was any host community should expect incentives. that commitment is no different from nevada when it comes to yucca mountain, and good news. the local county is consenting and ready to negotiate with the department of energy. in advance of yucca mountain even receiving its first deliver
pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
it personally, and as a matter of policy and law. embedded in a broader effort to advance equality and opportunity for lgbt americans and all americans. to deny the opportunity to any of our daughters and sons, solely on the basis of who they are, and who they love is to deny them the chance to live up to their own god-given potential. >> one of the things that she said in this video that gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights, which is an echo of her famous declaration at the international women's conference in beijing back in '95. where she really stirred the fires in international diplomacy as first lady by declaring women's rights human rights. >> and that was controversial back then. that was seen as a sort of revolutionary statement, the state department was nervous that she said that. they didn't really want that to happen. i think we will be looking back ten, 20 years on the notion that gay rights are human rights and think, well, duh, the same way we think about women's rights now. >> a real generational change certainly in the republican party as we w
requiring all voters to show photo i.d. in order to vote. a measure that opponents of that law say would suppress the vote, particularly among minority, elderly and young voters. joining me now, msnbc's joy reid. joy, michael steele said, look, you can't say this on monday and pass these kinds of things. this is part of what's alienating those voters. >> absolutely. apparently, the governor's and legislatures out there in the world didn't get the memo from nice reince priebus. the problem with these laws, lawrence, they are far more likely to disenfranchise black and hispanic youth, something like 72% of african-americans who go to vote are asked for i.d. something like 760% of hispanics, but half of white younger people who go to vote. so you're disenfranchising people directly and black and hispanic youth are far more likely to report not voting because either they don't have the i.d. or are perceived or think they don't have the i.d. so on one hand, we're going to speak more nicely to minorities, but as a back up, we're going to make it harder for them to vote. >> and joy, there's ten
law three years after it was signed into law by the president. the government right now is struggling to meet its own deadlines, even as the law's most critical provisions are set to kick in. experts predicting it may not go so smoothly. joining me now, bob cusack, managing editor of "the hill." good morning. let's talk about the hurdles that are ahead. how much is the president facing in getting the health care mandate, especially for the states, in place? >> well, the stakes here are enormous. this is going to be president obama's legacy, whether it's good or bad. the fact that obama care has actually survived to make it this long is surprising. of course, survived the supreme court challenge and the 2012 election. but implementing is going to be tricky. there are a lot of issues. immigration reform is one issue. will immigrants who get their green card be allowed on the rolls of health care. also, employers struggling to find out what is the minimum threshold, what do they have to cover. president obama made the promise if you don't want to change your health care you don't have to
duck for two months over the summer was that under the campaign finance laws, he couldn't use money that he'd already raised until after he received the nomination for president in august. i believe that our primary process is way too long. i think our calendar needs to be looked at. i think our debate calendar needs to be shrunk. i think we had way too many debates with candidates slicing and dicing each other, and i think they had to wait too long to get to the convention. i'm calling for a convention in june or july. we're going to set up a commission that's going to make that decision. i'm going to be a part of that. i'm going to chair that commission. ut no more august conventions. scommoip we're taking republican thoughts on those changes that reince priebus was talking about. give us a call. the phone numbers, we'll put up for you. we're doing our lines regionally for republicans just in this first segment of the "washington journal" tosmede a few other stories that are out there -- obama to pick tom perez for labor. that's the headline of the politico story this morning. pre
it will not be too late. myanmar's kevin is due to meet with journalists on saturday to discuss new media laws -- myanmar's government. some say the draft bill could undo the recent reforms. in myanmar is continuing to involve. mainly campaigners for freedom have been released from detention. an increasing number of journalists are on hand to report what they say, free of any prior censorship, but they are worried about proposals for new media laws. they say freedom of speech will be stifled just like it was by the previous military governments. tothis will bring us back square one. it is a made up law, which is intended to renew the 1962 media law. >> for those in the media industry, one of the most worrying aspects is a prison sentence of up to six months for publishers or journalists who break the rules and fail to pay fines. the loosely worded draft legislation would also ban materials that violate the military-backed constitution or right thing that could incite unrest. >> just as there are people for democracy in the forums, there are also people in the government i think who want to cli
's proposition eight. let's start with doma. it's the federal law that defines marriage as a union between and a man and a woman. it keeps gays from get iting th same rights. president clinton signed doma into law in 1996. he now says it should be struck down. avery freedman from cleveland, good to e see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman, good to see you as well. avery, you first on this. two cases before the supreme court. let's begin with doma. how much is at stake here? >> i think this is one of the great cases that the the supreme court will hear this term. that and prop eight. but doma which was compromised legislation and signed by bill clinton back in 1996 has always been questionable in terms of constitutionality. and two federal appeals courts have held that that law that restricts personnel rights that is by the federal government violates the constitution. it violates the equal protection law. in terms of the significance of it, it's really march madness. this is so important and so exciting because you have the solicitor general arguing against the constitutionality
. the president's healthcare reform law turns three tomorrow and for the first time, democrats join republicans to take a step back. tonight, chief national correspondent jim angling sets the staple for obamacare future looking at -- sets the stage for obam obamacare's futu. >> broad majority of the senate voted 79-20 last night to repeal part of obamacare. a tax on medical devices from hip replacements to mri machines. >> this is about innovation about jobs. >> other taxes are in place, including a $100 billion tax on insurance premiums. that will cause the average person $100 a year. part of the financing for what the president sees as his signature policy achievement. >> after a historic vote, healthcare reform is not an unmet promise. law of the land. >> some of those who know the business next are skeptical. >> a great misconception about the obamacare is just because you have health insurance you will get adequate healthcare. nothing could be further from the truth. >> obamacare will pay less to providers and increase number of insured by 30 million. >> patients don't get the services ren
a scandal. in the next administration, angelico van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law, martin van buren, who is a wood door. -- widower. tonight, on c-span. >> last week the senate veterans affairs committee held a hearing on veterans mental health care and the need for assuring timely access to care. the hearing heard testimony from two panels, including mental health specialists and military veterans advocates. according to the veterans affairs committee chair, veterans are committing suicide at a rate of more than 8003 year and he urged the affairs department to increase the hiring rate for mental health clinicians. [gavel] of thethis hearing saturn -- senate veterans' affairs committee is beginning. i want to start by thanking our wonderful panelists for their years of experience in the important areas they are discussing with us today. i want to thank the va for being here as well. know, it isk we all 10 years with the united states went to war in iraq, went to war in afghanistan before that. what we have learned in a variety of ways is that the cost of those wars has been ve
governor andrew cuomo wants to ease restriction option his just passed gun control law. the measure been as the sale of gun magazining holding less than seven bullets. he says it's unworkable since there is no seven rounds of magazine. so he wants a sale of clips holding up to ten rounds but forbid them from loading more than seven bullets in to them. meanwhile, also in new york, vice president biden today pledged to keep fighting for an assault weapons ban, even though fellow democrat harry reid is moving a bill forward without him. president obama's healthcare reform law turns three years old saturday. tonight, chief national correspondent jim angle tells us what we have seen so far. >> though obamacare opportunity fully take effect until january, parts of it are already in place, supporters, of course, point to the benefits. >> already more than 3 million young americans gain coverage through their parent's plan. preventive coverage free for tens of million of americans. >> children now have coverage. february they have a preexisting condition, children can stay on the parents' plan u
, a colorado sheriff explains why he won't enforce his' tough new you gun control law. and breakthrough artist of the year rock the house with the governor. ♪ >>> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. [ applause ] >> mike: thank you. thank you very much. a great lively audience and a fantastic show lined up for you. welcome to huckabee from the fox news studios in new york city. who would have thought that just over four months after liberals were dancing in the streets over president obama's reelection they are now crying in their beer and some don't even drink beer but they started. because they are are now realizeing that their taxes have gone up. way up in some cases. and obama care which was supposed to save them $2,500 a year is busting their budgets as the cost of their healthcare is soaring. ultraliberal comedian bill maher must have met with his accountant and gotten his tax bill. here is what he said. >> rich people i'm sure you would agree with this actually do pay the freight in the country. something like 70%. and here in california i just want to say liberals you could
] >>> laws designed to combat voter fraud are popular with one particular demographic, the one that lost the white house in november. today, those forces are arguing before the supreme court that an arizona voter fraud law is so important its stringent documentation requirements so necessary that we should forget that federal law trumps state law. indeed. to understand, just how popular these laws are with conservatives, watch how the crowd at cpac responded to south carolina governor nikki haley when she mentioned her own state's voter fraud law. >> every election in our state now requires photo i.d. before you vote. >> joining us now is democratic congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome, sir. >> it's good to be with you. >> what is your response, sir, to hearing the crowds cheer like that for voter i.d. laws? because that line about voter fraud got a bigger response even than her line trashing the affordable care act. >> first of all, martin, i believe that voting is a right. and it's something that is afforded to all of our citizens and we should not be doing anything to prev
the state passes jessica's law. and bill, why are you afraid to confront new york governor andrew cuomo on jessica's law? >> a number of hard hitting reports on the governor. we now believe that like governor christie in new jersey he will sign jessica's law if it gets to his desk and we're working on that. not easy in new york. new jersey we did it and now we're coming here. william, liverpool, england. bill, this year i did not drink on st. patrick's day instead donated 50 pounds to charity. well, a tip of the hot to you, william. thanks for taking my tip of the day. bill from california i was disgusted by jesse watters showing teenagers inebriated at st. patrick's day. and arc gnaw, brit hume looked hot last night in his sweater. so let me get this straight, kay, you are saying that mr. hume looked hot, as in smoking? that's got to make his week. i don't think he ever heard that before. and finally tonight the factor tip of the day, had to read a lot of fiction because so much real stuff to digest, i have more homework than most kids. and it's a very exciting book, much better
. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president agenda. host: here is the headline in the "washington post" -- how significant is it that the lead democrats and the senate is coming up with something and is going to move forward? it is significant that it is harry reid. prided himself on the support he received from the nra. he was able to use the support of gun rights groups to defeat in aepublican opponents difficult race. he has been reluctant to support gun control throughout the years. since the newtown shooting, he has been largely silent on the issue. it
and advocates are warningave major cultural shift if marriage equality becomes part of the law of the land. >> i wish it were just about the marriage altar. it is about much more. it's about altering all of society, with marriage goes what our children for taught, parents losing the right to define the morals for their children. it's about religious freedom. they are intertwined in our culture. it's about the right to conduct yours business as you see fit. >> support for same-sex marriage has groab, but it's favored by less than half, 49% of registered voters. one of the attorneys arguing for marriage equality this week says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be firew
that the job market out there. be the even more fearful than during the recession, which is the law. they're even less like a quit even though we should've expected a big increase in the recovery started. the more reason you can get that water level up even though you're adding a slaughter is because the number of jobs in terms of points is even lower than normal. one measure of how hard it is is to get the number of hires each month compared to the number of people unemployed and looking as well as the number of people who lived given up looking for work. you can see how the ratio has gone up and pretty much been stuck since 2009. we haven't really seen the number of jobs out there matching the number of people who are looking for work. and that gives you some idea of why this quit rate has not gone up, white state so though. people have said good idea of how hard it is to go and find a job. there's two groups of people being hurt the most. people at 55 and they basically lose their jobs there's a lot of trouble trying to find it and also very young people who are in train the job market
and though many key parts of the health care law don't go into effect until next year, many americans are already feeling the impact of the changes to the nation's health care system. let's check in now with a checkup on obama care. >> reporter: dueling opinions in washington today on the impact of obama care and whether it's been a boon or a boondoggle to americans and american businesses. obama says it protects americans from insurance companies and says the slaw saving people money. the president said in a statement, millions of americans are saving $600 a year on prescription drugs. millions of young people have beenable to stay on their family's health plan to age 26. preventive care, like mammograms for women and wellness visits for seen, i don't covered free of charge. most importantly, for the sake of our fiscal future, the growth of health care costs is beginning to slow. but the democratic-controlled senate voted early this week to repeal part of obama care, passed with bipartisan support. they repealed a tax on medical devices that would have increased the costs we all pay
. that is under current law, the law the president supports. he changed to make that, so it is financially feasible. our program would move us in the direction of premium support, which is what members of congress have. it will allow for a certain amount of money subsidy, a benefit check, if you will, for seniors to be able to utilize that to purchase what they want for themselves so they are able to have an insurance program that is much more responsive to them. as a physician, medicare patients are having a whale of a time finding doctors to take medicare. if you are a new medicare patients and your doctor prior to the agencies the five does not take medicare patients, you have a very difficult time finding a new dr. who will take a new medicare patient. one out of every three doctors in this country have limited the number of patients they are seeing. see no of every eight medicare patients at all. the program is flawed and needs to be reformed. we need to strengthen medicare. our guest,rice is republican of georgia. we are talking about budgetary matters. the numbers are on the screen.
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
counsels that i talked about in liberated areas, to develop their police forces because law and order as you heard in turkey, is a big issue. and so we need working with partners, i think the germans are going to help us with this. >> excuse me, ambassador, i only have a minute left. could you just answer my question? >> on the question about assad, there's two possibilities. we see him pulling forces in. will he hold out in damascus at the end? maybe. but a lot of observers think he might instead retreat to the heartland of the base of his support which would be up along the coast in northwest syria. we're not quite sure which he would do. >> let me reclaim my time. i'm sorry, mr. ambassador. the opposition, when mr. weber was asking you questions. the leading opposition movement, is that an al qaeda affiliate? that an al qaeda affiliate? >> no, absolutely is not. the al qaeda affiliate is a small part of the opposition. it is a small minority. the voice is getting louder. >> is this hassan hito the new prime minister, what is his affiliation with the muslim brotherhood? we heard rep
outcomes then it's the policy. >> paul: and perez was housing housing law to prosecute banks with this theory. >> that's right. >> paul: and he thought this might be illegal, why? because the disparate is used in some parts, but not in housing. >> it's employment. but they don't have the same language as title vii law and he was afraid at that st. paul would win this case. by the way, st. paul itself said it thought it would win, but dropping the case because it it didn't want to endanger important anti-discrimination work that the justice department was doing. so think about that, you have a senior member of the justice department leaning on other parts of government to withdraw a case, deny the supreme court the ability to rule on this disparate practice under the fair housing act and in the meantime, having the government in the join two cases that could have brought tens of millions of dollars to taxpayers. >> paul: can you believe any case like this, jason, where the official basically got somebody to drop a case the supreme court had already accepted? >> no, no, i can't
of what happened nobody has any idea what motivated this murder. law enforcement said they're not jumping to conclusions whether his job or his job as second in command of state prisons in missouri before he came to colorado, whether any of those job titles had anything to do with his murder last night. they said they're keeping an open mind as to the possibility that what he does for a living had nothing to do with why he was killed. but in response to the killing, at what is already a heightened time of political tension in the state, colorado officials have responded by increasing security for other top government officials in the state. they have also increased security at the governor's mansion. this is happening in colorado at an already heightened time. the colorado legislature has been debating and passing gun reform legislation and that debate has been unusually contentious. they have pledged on the floor of the senate that they will disobey them. they will disobey the state's new laws. democratic lawmakers have received threats for their support of gun reform. criminal charges h
. eight shotgun shells expand background checks the background check fee, and the laws will go into affect on july 1st. it happened in the state of colorado where today they woke up the department of corrections was asass fated. he's friend of governor john hickenlooper. john hickenlooper said he signed this ban on high capacity weapons because it's a sticking point on the gun control debate. >> i think this ban on high capacity magazines is of that same ilk. it allows us to con tim contemplate someone who is bent on destruction just the seconds that it allows others to escape. >> michael: coloradoans were able to do what the united states senate was unable to do. dianne feinstein's ban did not pass on the floor vote because harry reid decided they were not going it to put it in their gun bill that they're going to put on the floor. it's an assaults weapons ban. over 200 weapons are still available to americans. but no, this was not good enough. the reason was because reid and other democratic senators were afraid of how it would play. max baucus of montana jon tester of montana. mark begi
the governor of colorado signed an important gun safety bill into law, a series of bills into law. the new laws limit ammunition magazines and requires universal background checks to be paid for by gun customers themselves. they followed new york who just over a month ago became the state with the toughest gun laws in the country. outlawing magazines with more than seven rounds and gun safety is a national problem but the states are leading the way. none more than the state of new york. joining me now is the man who played the pivotal role in getting those laws passed, new york state attorney general eric schneiderman. mr. attorney general, welcome back to the show. you had a top law enforcement official in one of the biggest states in the country. tell us how you managed to get things done what congress so far has not been able to do. >> i think we ought to give credit to my colleagues in government and really on a bipartisan basis in new york, i think people seized the political moment. it was a galvanizing force and the bill that the governor and senate and assembly passed and i'm now defend
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 406 (some duplicates have been removed)